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Chess News
  1. Rounds 4 and 5 of the three events that make up the Madrid Chess Festival took place on Wednesday. The Closed A tournament has Levy Rozman, also known as Gotham Chess, topping the standings with 4/5 points. The famous streamer defeated Cuban GM Lelys Martínez with the white pieces in round 5. Meanwhile, three players are sharing the lead in the Closed B event, which has 10-year-old Faustino Oro in fifth place with a fifty-percent score. | Photo: Federico Marín’s X account
  2. In this very instructive, and informative game, Svitlana managed to draw against a strong, Canadian IM. But the truth is, she almost had to forfeit the game! The reason for Svitlana arriving far too late to the game, and what you can learn from the opening, middle game with hanging pawns, and endgame technique, you will see in the video.
  3. It is startling to think that eight years have already passed by since the death, at the comparatively early age of 68, of the world’s greatest chess trainer. It is equally startling to think that there will be a whole generation of chess players who know nothing about Mark Dvoretsky, his work or his achievements. Fortunately there is a new book from New in Chess to remind the chess world about Mark Dvoretsky. CHESS Magazine review by Sean Marsh.
  4. In this section we compare the risks playing a game of chess brings to your life – as compared to other activities a person may undertake. For example, riding a bike for 25 miles, running a marathon, climbing Matterhorn – or marrying Henry VIII. The assessment is given in micromort units, which can be used to generally calculate the risks under which people are in everyday life. | Picture Willie Benegas and Doug Pierson on Mountainmadness.com
  5. In the 1971 Candidate Matches Bobby Fischer faced Mark Taimanov In Vancouver, Canada. The American defeated his opponent from the Soviet Union with a "dry" 6-0 score. But matters could have started differently. In the first game it was Taimanov who put on the pressure, and even had winning chances. He played 27.h3, which nobody considered a bad move – until Kasparov pointed out its defect in 2004. Today's riddle deals with the position before White's 27th move. Computers find it devilishly difficult to find the best continuation. Can you?
  6. Why is the rook’s pawn called the "worst enemy of the knight"? How do you make best use of the "Knight Check Shadow" and when should you enter the "Karpov Distance"? In the new ChessBase Magazine #219, Karsten Mueller shows you the most important techniques in the endgame with knight against pawn(s) in part #9 of his series "Fundamental Endgame Knowledge". Take the chance and test your technique in two interactive training videos in this week’s CBM reading sample. Have fun!
  7. He was the coach of the USSR Youth National team from the mid-60s, until the collapse of the Soviet Union – a driving force behind the great generations of Soviet chess, but always in the shadow. On 30 April Anatoly Awraamowitsch Bykhovsky celebrates his 90th birthday. Chess Trainer Adrian Mykhalchyshyn describes the career of the man who helped created the chess zenith of the USSR.
  8. During the endgame, stalemate is a resource that can enable the player with the inferior position to draw the game rather than lose. In more complex positions, stalemate is much rarer, usually taking the form of a swindle that succeeds only if the superior side is inattentive. Chess Trainer GM Efstratios Grivas shows us how a "mad rook" can complicate matters for the superior side.
  9. He was born on 3 June 2011 in Bursa, Turkey. On April 1st (no April Fool's joke) the twelve-year-old, playing in the very strong GRENKE Chess Open, Yagiz Kaan Erdpgmus scored 7.0/9 points with a 2646 performance. With that he had fulfilled his final GM norm and become the youngest grandmaster in the world – the fourth youngest in chess history. We will be watching this young boy carefully. | Photo Ugur Medya
  10. Svitlana dug deep to find some outstanding, beautiful tactics, by all the men's and women's candidates, who will compete in Toronto soon. Arne is trying hard to solve all the puzzles, and get 8 out of 8 in both videos. Will he succeed? And how will you do, dear viewer? These two videos are the perfect start to get into the mood for the candidates tournament!